Plant Garlic In The Garden: How To Plant Garlic In The Fall

Plant Garlic In The Garden: How To Plant Garlic In The Fall

Gardeners look forward to the time-honored ritual of planting garlic when autumn’s crisp breeze ushers in the promise of harvest. Garlic’s powerful flavor and culinary adaptability not only lend zing to our dishes, but it also has a special place in the heart of home gardens. Let’s delve into the stages and secrets of how to plant garlic in the fall, from selecting the correct types to mastering the complexities of soil preparation in this article. Prepare for a delectable journey that begins in your yard and ends with the colorful, aromatic bulbs of homegrown garlic.

When Should You Plant Garlic?

When Should You Plant Garlic?

In most areas, fall is usually the optimum season to plant garlic. Garlic should not be planted until after the autumnal equinox in late September. Garlic, like onions and other plants in the Allium family, is sensitive to day length and matures during the summer’s longest days. It gets a head start on the growing season by planting in the fall, and it will be one of the first plants to sprout in the garden the following spring.

How To Plant Garlic In The Fall

How To Plant Garlic In The Fall

Planting garlic in the fall permits the roots to develop. When winter comes and the ground freezes, the plants go dormant. When the soil warms up in the spring, the garlic will resume growing where it left off.

Prepare Your Growing Area

Garlic thrives in bright sun and porous soil. Choose a garden bed that has not grown anything in the onion family in the last two years and receives at least six hours of sunlight per day. Remove weeds and apply slow-release organic fertilizer according to the package directions. Add about 2 inches of finished compost and stir it into the top 4-6 inches of soil.
Make your growing bed 4-6 inches wide in all directions. Make your holes 4-inches deep. Plot 6 cloves per square foot if you’re utilizing the square foot gardening method.

Split Your Garlic Seed

When you buy garlic seed, you are actually buying garlic heads. Individual cloves of garlic are used to grow garlic. Before planting, separate your cloves. Sort your largest and most healthy-looking cloves for planting. Planting the largest cloves will result in larger garlic heads the following year. Cook with the smaller and damaged cloves. This article mentions your favorite hats at super low prices. Choose from same-day delivery, drive-up delivery or order pickup.

Garlic cloves should be planted

Insert a garlic clove into each hole, flat side down, pointed end up. Cover and compact the soil.

Garlic Bed Mulching

After planting, thoroughly water the garlic bed and cover with a light layer of mulch, such as straw or shredded leaves. To keep weeds at bay until the ground freezes, aim for 2-3 inches of mulch. To insulate the soil once the ground freezes, apply another layer of 2-3 inches of mulch. This helps to keep the garlic roots from being lifted out of the earth by freezing and thawing cycles.
Green garlic shoots will appear through the mulch when the earth warms in the spring. If you utilized an all-purpose organic fertilizer while planting, your garlic is off to a wonderful start. During dry spells, water the garlic bed when the soil feels dry one inch below the surface. If the foliage exhibits indications of stress (yellow tips), feed it with organic fish emulsion fertilizer. Follow the directions on the bottle.
If you planted hardneck garlic, you will be able to pick garlic scapes a few weeks before the garlic bulb is completed growing. These delicate, garlicky shoots are delightful.

Garlic Plant Care

From the time the shoots sprout in early spring until about June 1, feed the plants every other week with a liquid fish emulsion fertilizer. Water is essential throughout the bulb-forming stage in early summer, so aim for an inch each week, including rainfall.
If you grow hard-neck garlic—the best type for the northeast—around the summer solstice, your garlic will send up a seed stalk known as a scape. This should be cut off to encourage the plants to focus all of their energy on bulb production.
These stalks twist into a loop and are tasty. Chop them and toss them into a salad, stir fry, soup, scrambled eggs, or any other food you want to add a little garlic taste to. They create an excellent pesto when blended with olive oil and parmesan cheese.
Leave one or two flower stems standing to assist you decide when to harvest your garlic. The outer wrappers on the garlic bulbs begin to dry about four weeks before harvest, so stop watering in July. Too much water at that point can taint the wrapper or possibly produce mold.

When and How to Harvest Garlic

When and How to Harvest Garlic

Harvest your garlic towards the end of July or early August, when the lowest third to half of the leaves have turned brown and wilted but the upper leaves are still green.
It can be difficult to determine when to harvest, which is where the flower stems can come in handy. When the leaves begin to turn brown and the scapes uncurl and stand up straight, it is time to harvest.

Garlic Preservation

Hang bunches of freshly harvested garlic to cure in a cool, well-ventilated, shady location for 3-4 weeks. Brush off any loose soil, prune the roots to 1/4 inch, and cut the tops back to an inch or two above the bulb before storage. Hard-neck garlic will keep for five months and soft neck garlic for eight months under ideal conditions of near freezing temperatures and 65-70% humidity.
In conclusion, as the autumn breezes bring cooler days, the garlic cloves silently grow their roots, preparing for the transforming process that will take place under the surface. Come spring, your efforts will blossom into a vivid display of green sprouts, eventually culminating in bulbs that capture the soul of your garden’s dedication. The secrets of how to plant garlic in the fall, from soil preparation to selecting the best types, become the threads that weave the tapestry of a good garlic crop.

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